Lightweight SVG icons for your web project #

Evil Icons are completely free and licensed under MIT. We use Evil Icons in almost all of our new and upcoming sites — and we would love you to do that as well. Contributions are welcome!

Complete with Rails, Sinatra, and npm integrations.

next-update answers the question: “Is it safe to upgrade my npm module’s dependencies?” #

Upgrading your library’s dependencies can be a scary proposition. Not upgrading your library’s dependencies can be even scarier. Thankfully, next-update is here to help. Let’s imagine:

You would like to update lodash and async to latest versions, but not sure if this would break anything. With next-update it is easy.

You run the next-update command and it tells you whether or not updating any of your dependencies breaks you tests. If you don’t have tests, I guess you should go write some…

#134: Open Sourcing .NET Core with the Microsoft .NET team

This week, we have members from .NET core team at Microsoft on the show to discuss Microsoft’s motivation for open sourcing the base class libraries of .NET, open source vs source open, the true goal of open sourcing .NET Core, and more.

Side-by-side highlighted command line diffs #

Jeff Kaufman’s icdiff takes advantage of your terminal’s ability to display colors to show you the differences between similar files without getting in the way.

icdiff-css-demo-tall

It’s not meant to replace the built-in diff command, but complement it.

Firefox is coming to iOS #

Mozilla recently announced that they’re finally bringing Firefox to iOS. They’ll have to use iOS’s built-in rendering engine like everybody else, which begs the question: What makes this Firefox?

Time will tell whether they’re too late to the game or not. In the meantime, the source code is freely available (and under heavy development). From the README:

This is a work in progress on some early ideas. Don’t get too attached to this code. Tomorrow everything will be different.

Could be a fun project to track, especially if you’re interested in Swift.

#133: All Things Perl With Curtis “Ovid” Poe

This week, we spoke with Curtis “Ovid” Poe. He shares how he got started with Perl, what Perl is really good at, why he doesn’t expect everyone to love Perl, why Perl doesn’t get no respect, the difference between Perl 5 and Perl 6, why the Perl community doesn’t like marketing, and more.

101: A modern JS utility library #

Lots of goodies to be had with Tejesh Mehta’s 101 utility lib. What makes it different than Underscore/Lodash, you ask?

  1. 101 will be maintained to minimize overlap with vanilla JS
  2. No need for custom builds

In addition to functional versions of many JS built-ins (and, or, equals, etc.), 101 also boasts a bunch of identity functions, pluck, hasProperties, omit, and more.

Level up your Git game with git-extras #

With 37 (yes, I counted them) Git commands to add to your arsenal, git-extras is pretty awesome. A few of my favs include git-summary, git-effort, and of course git-changelog.

(I like git-changelog‘s name, not its functionality. I’m with Olivie on this one.)

Prophet: a Python microframework for financial markets #

Prophet strives to let the programmer focus on modeling financial strategies, portfolio management, and analyzing backtests. It achieves this by having few functions to learn to hit the ground running, yet being flexible enough to accomodate sophistication.

Looks great for anybody dipping their toe in to financial market software. Nice double entendre, too.

MetricsGraphics.js uses D3 to visualize time-series data with ease #

Speaking of D3, Mozilla open sourced a library they use on top of D3 to visualize time-series data in a “principled, consistent and responsive way.”

If you’re serious about visualizations, you’ll still want to learn D3 itself, but it’s great when we can optimize and simplify common use cases. That’s exactly what MetricsGraphics.js does. Here’s a taste:

metrics-graphics-examples

Check out all of the examples of what’s possible here: