Side-by-side highlighted command line diffs #

Jeff Kaufman’s icdiff takes advantage of your terminal’s ability to display colors to show you the differences between similar files without getting in the way.

icdiff-css-demo-tall

It’s not meant to replace the built-in diff command, but complement it.

Firefox is coming to iOS #

Mozilla recently announced that they’re finally bringing Firefox to iOS. They’ll have to use iOS’s built-in rendering engine like everybody else, which begs the question: What makes this Firefox?

Time will tell whether they’re too late to the game or not. In the meantime, the source code is freely available (and under heavy development). From the README:

This is a work in progress on some early ideas. Don’t get too attached to this code. Tomorrow everything will be different.

Could be a fun project to track, especially if you’re interested in Swift.

101: A modern JS utility library #

Lots of goodies to be had with Tejesh Mehta’s 101 utility lib. What makes it different than Underscore/Lodash, you ask?

  1. 101 will be maintained to minimize overlap with vanilla JS
  2. No need for custom builds

In addition to functional versions of many JS built-ins (and, or, equals, etc.), 101 also boasts a bunch of identity functions, pluck, hasProperties, omit, and more.

Level up your Git game with git-extras #

With 37 (yes, I counted them) Git commands to add to your arsenal, git-extras is pretty awesome. A few of my favs include git-summary, git-effort, and of course git-changelog.

(I like git-changelog‘s name, not its functionality. I’m with Olivie on this one.)

Prophet: a Python microframework for financial markets #

Prophet strives to let the programmer focus on modeling financial strategies, portfolio management, and analyzing backtests. It achieves this by having few functions to learn to hit the ground running, yet being flexible enough to accomodate sophistication.

Looks great for anybody dipping their toe in to financial market software. Nice double entendre, too.

MetricsGraphics.js uses D3 to visualize time-series data with ease #

Speaking of D3, Mozilla open sourced a library they use on top of D3 to visualize time-series data in a “principled, consistent and responsive way.”

If you’re serious about visualizations, you’ll still want to learn D3 itself, but it’s great when we can optimize and simplify common use cases. That’s exactly what MetricsGraphics.js does. Here’s a taste:

metrics-graphics-examples

Check out all of the examples of what’s possible here:

Would you like some Mongo with your Postgres? #

Speaking of PostgreSQL, ToroDB is a JSON database that runs on top of Postgres.

JSON documents are stored relationally, not as a blob/jsonb. This leads to significant storage and I/O savings. It speaks natively the MongoDB protocol, meaning that it can be used with any mongo-compatible client.

MongoDB client compatibility. Smart. Still early days, though:

ToroDB follows a RERO (Release Early, Release Often) policy. Current version is considered a “developer preview” and hence is not suitable for production use. However, any feedback, contributions, help and/or patches are very welcome.

pgweb: a web-based PostgreSQL database browser written in Go #

PostgreSQL is — hands-down — my favorite persistence engine. However, it has long lacked the tooling of its alternatives. Tools like pgweb are changing that story.

This is a web-based browser for PostgreSQL database server. It’s written in Go and works on Mac OSX, Linux and Windows machines… This project is an attempt to create a very simple and portable application to work with PostgreSQL databases.

pgweb-query