A tool for showing the progress of cp, rm, dd, and friends #

cv — short for Coreutils Viewer — is a Linux (Mac port) tool which looks for coreutils basic commands (cp, mv, dd, tar, gzip/gunzip, cat, etc.) that are currently running on your system and displays the percentage of copied data.

This could come in handy. Here’s a shot of what it looks like in action:

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Collect your thoughts and notes without leaving the command line #

jrnl is a great little text-based journaling tool with a command line interface. Why plain text files? I love this tidbit from the readme:

you can put them into a Dropbox folder for instant syncing and you can be assured that your journal will still be readable in 2050, when all your fancy iPad journal applications will long be forgotten.

At first blush, the interface looks really well thought out. I don’t journal much, but jrnl just might get me started.

Proverbs from the programmer #

Fun little repo by Antonin Januska:

Programming and development often teaches one wisdom that cannot be attained elsewhere. Coding and programming, as some have said, is a way of life, not just job. When you are a coder, that is a big part of who you are at work and outside of work. So, let’s come together, and put down our wisdom for future generations to see and learn from.

My favorite of the bunch: “The best code is no code at all”

Xiki is reimagining the shell #

I’m a huge user/advocate of the traditional command shell, but as a teacher I know the troubles people have getting started.

Xiki looks like a great effort at bringing the power of the shell to everyone while adding some nice features for power users. They’re in the middle of a Kickstarter to fund further development, so it’s a great time to show your support.

CanCanCan picks up where CanCan left off #

Ryan Bates’ unfortunate burnout-induced hiatus from open source left his projects unmaintaned. CanCan — the much beloved authorization gem for Ruby on Rails — was no exception.

CanCan may be dead, but long live CanCanCan!

This repo is a continuation of the dead CanCan project. Our mission is to keep CanCan alive and moving forward, with maintenance fixes and new features. Pull Requests are welcome!

This is what I love about open source. Great ideas aren’t bound to their creators. All it takes is one person who cares enough to pick up the torch and run with it.

All the Swift things

Apple shocked the developer community yesterday with its announcement of Swift, a new programming language for its Cocoa and Cocoa Touch platforms.

Interested in Swift? Here’s a list of related docs, gists, and projects to get you up and learning…

docopt gets CLI argument parsing right

Brilliant ideas can be painfully obvious in retrospect. They’ll leave you thinking, “Why didn’t we I think of that before?!” Docopt is that for parsing CLI arguments.

Scratch 2.0 #

Scratch is an educational programming language used by students, educators, and all ages to create stories, art, animation, movies and much more. The team from MIT has just open sourced the Scratch 2.0 editor code.

If you’re interested in Flash development take a look at the current issues and create a pull request or contribute by reporting bugs. Core structure changes will require collaboration with the team. According to MIT statistics more than 3 million users have registered so even a small contribution can have a big impact.

Want to teach Scratch to your own kids or use it in a local technology club? You’ll find these kid-tested resources handy:

Consider joining the Scratch Education Group or contributing to development issues if you want to get involved.

Git meets Bitcoin #

Still early days, but pretty cool tech coming from the team at Gitchain:

Gitchain is an application of the exciting ideas behind Bitcoin, Namecoin and DHT applied to Git hosting. Once you install it, it acts as a local proxy to the entire Gitchain P2P network.

I love seeing the Bitcoin protocol (perhaps the crypto-currency’s greatest virtue) applied to different domains.

Looks like the project has been Kickstarted as well. It should be fun to follow along and see where the community takes it.

Trash – a safer and cross-platform `rm` #

Instead of permanently deleting files from the command line, this little tool moves them to the trash.

Like me, you might be thinking, “But I can do the same thing with mv.” To this Sindre writes:

Not really. The mv command isn’t cross-platform and moving to trash is not just about moving the file to a “trash” directory. On all OSes you’ll run into file conflicts. The user won’t easily be able to restore the file. It won’t work on an external drive. The trash directory location varies between Windows versions. For Linux there’s a whole spec you need to follow. On OS X you’ll loose the Put back feature.

Who knew?

Cleaner class-based controllers for AngularJS #

Classy is Dave Jeffery’s attempt to clean up AngularJS controllers. It removes the requirement to annotate your dependencies, automatically adds functions to the controller’s $scope, and adds a convenient way of watching things without dirtying up your init function.

Also, the project’s homepage has a really nice code sample that switches between JavaScript and CoffeeScript versions. Check it.

A Hapi Ninja for Node.js #

Earlier this year we had Eran Hammer on the podcast to talk about the success of Node.js at Walmart for the infamous influx of traffic that Black Friday brings them. At the core of their success lies Hapi, the rich framework for building web applications and services with Node from Walmart Labs.

Hapi is a lot like Sinatra for Ruby in the fact that you start with a single server file and expand as needed from there to create a file and directory structure to organize and support your application code.

While hacking on Hapi recently, I found Hapi Ninja. If you’re just getting started like me, Hapi Ninja can serve as a boilerplate to learn from with Hapi, or even as the starting point for your Node web service.

It was also a pleasant surprise to see Saul Maddox was a native Houston Texan like myself. Sadly we’ve never met.

The New York Times opens up the code and data that generates their Senate forecasts #

The New York Times is taking a crack at forecasting the results of the upcoming Senate races. They’re currently predicting a tossup, but we don’t have to just take their word for it. The code and data that runs the election-forecasting model is open to the public!

The model is built with R, a programming language for statistical computing. I’d love for somebody with some R knowledge to write an article that walks through the codebase explaining how it all fits together. Ping us if you’re up to the challenge…

Gogs is a self-hosted Git service written in Go #

Gogs looks like a nice, new (still in Alpha) option if you want to self-host some Git repositories with a web interface similar to GitHub’s.

Gogs

It’s written purely in Go, so installation should be dead simple. From the README:

Gogs only needs one binary to setup your own project hosting on the fly!

Worth a look.