#140: Aurelia, Durandal, and leaving AngularJS with Rob Eisenberg

Rob Eisenberg is our guest this week. Rob is a former AngularJS team member, who left the AngularJS team to work on his own startup, Durandal Inc and their first open source product Aurelia, a next generation JavaScript client framework that supports ES6, WebComponents, Object.observe and more.

#139: The Rise of io.js with Mikeal Rogers

Our guest this week is Mikeal Rogers to discuss io.js, why the fork exists, why they choose open governance, the roadmap and future of io.js, supporting ES6, burnout while working in open source, and the steps you can take to get involved with io.js.

GifW00t! #

A pure JavaScript web recorder.

Just add one script tag to your page, and users will be able to record and replay their interaction with the site.

I can think of many applications for a tool like GifW00t! What would you do with it?

What You See is HTML #

Voog’s WYSIWYG rich text editor is library agnostic, feature-rich, and supports all modern web browsers. Give it a try if you need to provide rich text editing for your users.

next-update answers the question: “Is it safe to upgrade my npm module’s dependencies?” #

Upgrading your library’s dependencies can be a scary proposition. Not upgrading your library’s dependencies can be even scarier. Thankfully, next-update is here to help. Let’s imagine:

You would like to update lodash and async to latest versions, but not sure if this would break anything. With next-update it is easy.

You run the next-update command and it tells you whether or not updating any of your dependencies breaks you tests. If you don’t have tests, I guess you should go write some…

101: A modern JS utility library #

Lots of goodies to be had with Tejesh Mehta’s 101 utility lib. What makes it different than Underscore/Lodash, you ask?

  1. 101 will be maintained to minimize overlap with vanilla JS
  2. No need for custom builds

In addition to functional versions of many JS built-ins (and, or, equals, etc.), 101 also boasts a bunch of identity functions, pluck, hasProperties, omit, and more.

MetricsGraphics.js uses D3 to visualize time-series data with ease #

Speaking of D3, Mozilla open sourced a library they use on top of D3 to visualize time-series data in a “principled, consistent and responsive way.”

If you’re serious about visualizations, you’ll still want to learn D3 itself, but it’s great when we can optimize and simplify common use cases. That’s exactly what MetricsGraphics.js does. Here’s a taste:

metrics-graphics-examples

Check out all of the examples of what’s possible here: