Track issues and todos while you code with Watson #

Watson lets you create issues while you code, including custom labels, without ever having to interrupt your workflow. It syncs with remote services like GitHub and Bitbucket — Push locally created issues and get the status of remote issues right in your command line.

Pick your flavor and install either the Ruby or Perl version.

Keep an Eye on your processes #

If you aren’t happy with the current process monitoring tools out there, check out Eye. It uses Celluloid to provide multi-threaded process monitoring that behaves very similarly to Bluepill. One valuable addition is the ability to get more information about the processes running:

$ eye i(nfo)
test
  samples
    sample1 ....................... up  (21:52, 0%, 13Mb, <4107>)
    sample2 ....................... up  (21:52, 0%, 12Mb, <4142>)

Other bonus tools include debugging configurations and tailing the logs of the processes being monitored.

#110: Capistrano and Burnout with Lee Hambley

Andrew and Adam talk with Lee Hambley about some serious subjects such as Capistrano 3.0/2.0, open source burnout, various conversations around deploying, Ruby, respect, handing over the reigns and more. If you hack on open source or run an open source project, you should listen to this episode.

Git your game on with Githug! #

Githug is a cool new way to learn git by Gary Rennie. From the readme:

Githug is designed to give you a practical way of learning git. It has a series of levels, each utilizing git commands to ensure a correct answer.

Game on!

#108: Exercism.io with Katrina Owen

Adam and Jerod talk with Katrina Owen – Panelist on Ruby Rogues, Instructor at Jumpstart Lab and creator of Exercism.io, an open source platform for crowd-sourced code reviews on daily practice problems.

Avdi Grimm open sources Quarto after self-publishing Confident Ruby #

If you’re thinking about self-publishing a technical book, you should take a look at Quarto, a Ruby-based toolchain for generating ebooks in EPUB, Mobi, and PDF formats.

Quarto is essentially a set of rake tasks backed by a Ruby library. You can check out the README for all the details, but here’s an excerpt about the tool’s flexibility:

Quarto doesn’t (yet) introduce any revolutionary ideas to e-publishing. Instead, it ties familiar tools together in a way that lets you write the way you want to.

There are a lot of tools that try to tie together an end-to-end publishing pipeline. But when you want to interpose your own processing in between steps, you’re out of luck. The fact that Quarto is structured as a set of Rake tasks means that you can add your own dependencies, your own steps, or tack extra processing onto any of the existing steps just by adding to your project’s Rakefile.

Buyer beware. We reached out to Avdi to see if he wanted us to say anything in particular about the project, he replied:

here’s a quote: “It’s a mess because I coded it in a frantic week” :-P

Ahh, I know the feeling all too well.

Is he just being humble or is Quarto not ready for prime time? Hey, it’s open source so you can be the judge!

If you’re curious about Confident Ruby, be sure to check out this blog post where he announces the book’s release as well as Quarto’s.

Share your thoughts and upvote on Hacker News.

#102: RVM and Managing Ruby versions with Michal Papis

Adam Stacoviak and Jerod Santo talk with Michal Papis about the history and future of RVM, the plan for RVM 2.0, the complexities of managing your Ruby version, Ruby 2.0 and more. SPONSOR: App Sketchbook – use the code “DANSENTME” to save $5.00 Subscribe to The Changelog Weekly! Michal Papis (mpapis) on Twitter mpapis (Michal […]

Super powered Jekyll templating with Jekyll Liquid Plus #

For those of you running a Jekyll or Octopress powered blog, Brandon Mathis has been working like crazy on Octopress 3.0, determining what it is and isn’t, and along the way breaking off pieces to release as independent gems.

His goal in doing this, is to allow Jekyll users to be able to install a few gems and be able to use most of Octopress’s goodies without having to change a thing.

Yesterday, he announced Jekyll Liquid Plus.

Jekyll Liquid Plus includes:

  • Redesigned, but backwards compatible: include, assign and capture tags
  • All new: render, wrap, wrap_include and return tags

From this Alpha post from Brandon:

My goal for Octopress is to be a writer-focused usability layer on top of Jekyll and a cohesive framework for building themes and plugins. Octopress will work alongside Jekyll without getting in the way at all. It’s shaping up nicely.

Is it safe to say that Octopress 3.0 is coming soon? Many are waiting with baited breath. My guess is that with this and the other independent gems Brandon has released, he is getting close.

Check out the source for Jekyll Liquid Plus on GitHub.

Subscribe to Weekly to hear about more projects from Brandon.

Remote pairing in the browser? Pssh! #

Full disclosure: I am the creator and owner of Portly. Pssh works with or without Portly. But, without Portly, adding a local tunnel to your machine can be a pain.


If you’re a fan of episode #90 on pair programming with Avdi Grimm, you know that pairing can be an invaluable tool for debugging, learning, and just overall better code. Unfortunately, remote pairing generally gets less enthusiasm since there’s such a learning curve to the setup, and it tends to feel inconvenient.

Portly has launched a new tool called Pssh that makes remote pairing simple with just a gem and a browser. Install Pssh and run it either inside your tmux/screen session or from a vanilla shell, and your buddies can remote pair with you from their browser.

> gem install pssh
> pssh

If Pssh is started inside a tmux or screen session, it boots up its own console for you to manage users. If started from a plain shell, it behaves just like you opened a fresh console and kills Pssh when you exit.

Paired with the native Mac app from Portly, you can share a url to your session and lock it down with HTTP Authentication. Open up another browser tab to check out the changes to the local website you’re working on in real-time.

Check out the homepage, the readme or the source on GitHub to learn more about Pssh and how it works.

Share your thoughts and comments on Hacker News.

A startup template for Ruby on Rails 4 applications #

Way back in January, I wrote a blog post called “Rails has two default stacks”. In it, I discussed how people like to customize the defaults that Ruby on Rails gives you. Your company might prefer Postgres/HAML/RSpec, for example, over the default MySQL/ERB/MiniTest.

There’s an under-used feature of Rails that allows you to automate the creation of your own stack: templates. Check it:

$ rails --help
Usage:

  rails new APP_PATH [options]

Options:

-r, [--ruby=PATH]              # Path to the Ruby binary of your choice
                               # Default: /opt/rubies/ruby-2.0.0-p195/bin/ruby
-m, [--template=TEMPLATE]      # Path to some application template (can be a filesystem path or URL)

Application template? Yep. There’s very little documentation on this feature, unfortunately. There is a work in progress Rails Guide that gives some answers, but it’s not done yet.

Anyway, the TL;DR is this: you can write a little script to help initialize a Rails app just the way you want to. And Rails startup template is exactly that.

Here’s some of the things it gives you out of the box:

  1. Adds analytics-ruby, simple_form, uuidtools, rspec, guard-rspec, and bourbon gems, as well as a few more.
  2. Creates a new git repository, and optionally a new one on GitHub
  3. Sets up foreman for easy environment variable and background service config.
  4. Removes include_tree . from your application.css, since the author prefers to require things manually.

There are some other features, as well.

Check it out on GitHub and vote it up on Hacker News.

Renewed efforts to translate the Ruby Hacking Guide into English #

Vincent Isambart, a French Rubyist living in the land of the rising sun (Tokyo, Japan), and a few others have started a new organization on GitHub to renew the efforts to help translate the Ruby Hacking Guide (originally written in Japanese by Minero AOKI) into English.

The Ruby Hacking Guide is a book that explains how the ruby interpreter (the official C implementation of the Ruby language) works internally.

If you’d like to help…

People who are good at Ruby, C and Japanese or English are needed. Those good at Japanese (native Japanese speakers are of course welcome) can help translate and those good at English (preferably native speakers) can help correct mistakes, and rewrite badly written parts… Knowing Ruby and C well is really a requirement because it helps avoiding many mistranslations and misinterpretations.

Interested parties can join in by forking this repo to get started. There’s also a mailing list to introduce yourself — mention who you are, your skills, and how much free time you have.

For those wanting to read what’s been translated so far, check out the public version online.

Have an opinion? Discuss it on Hacker News.

ht/ Hiro Asari via Steve Klabnik.

#97: API wrappers, Ruby and open source with Drew Blas

Adam Stacoviak and Andrew Thorp talk with Drew Blas of Chargify about API wrappers, Ruby, open source, and more. You can tune-in LIVE on Tuesday’s at 5pm CST. Drew Blas – Explorer « The life and code of a passionate developer drewblas (Drew Blas) on GitHub drewblas (drewblas) on Twitter drewblas/consignment chargify (Chargify) chargify/chargify2 chargify/doculab

#96: Ruby off Rails with Jesse Wolgamott

Adam Stacoviak and guest co-host Tim Smith talk with Jesse Wolgamott about learning Ruby, his course and mentorship Ruby off Rails, and more! You can tune-in LIVE on Tuesday’s at 5pm CST. J.Wo Ruby Off Rails | Online Ruby Course full of mentoring and collaboration. jwo (Jesse Wolgamott) Comal Productions | web. mobile. training. code […]

#94: Sass, libsass, Haml and more with Hampton Catlin

Adam Stacoviak and Andrew Thorp talk with Hampton Catlin about Sass, libsass, Haml, Tritium, Moovweb and more. You can tune-in LIVE on Tuesday’s at 5pm CST. hcatlin/libsass Tritium from Moovweb, the web transformation platform Moovweb Sass – Syntactically Awesome Stylesheets The Sass Way The Sass Jerk – Articles Getting started with Sass and Compass – […]

When it comes to backups, this gem has it all #

Backup, a tool written by Michael van Rooijen , has provided me so much value over the years that it’d be a shame not to give it some Changelog love.

Backup is a system utility for Linux and OS X which allows you to easily model your backup system using a nice Ruby DSL. The greatest thing about Backup, aside from the fact that it Just Works, is that it has built-in support for just about anything you would want to do.

It handles compression, encryption, cloud storage, splitting, syncing, notifications, logging, and on, and on.

With all that functionality, you might expect Backup to be overwhelming to get started with. Not so. It also has nifty generators which spit out documented model code so you can learn and tweak as you need. If that’s not enough, there is a Getting Started page and a very useful wiki which explains, in detail, all of the subsystems.

Backup is MIT licensed and hosted on GitHub.

Love Rubular? Here are a few open source copycats to checkout.

Rubular is awesome for working with regexes and testing things out. It’s fast, simple, and allows you to write/test/debug regexes super quick. The bummer is that it’s not open source, so taking a peek under the hood to learn how its built isn’t possible. (insert sad face) Here are two options on GitHub that claim […]

#92: Sidekiq, Ruby, and more with Mike Perham

Adam Stacoviak and Andrew Thorp talk with Mike Perham about sustaining open source, sidekiq, message processing with Ruby, and more. You can tune-in LIVE on Tuesday’s at 5pm CST. mperham (Mike Perham) mperham/sidekiq · GitHub mperham/dalli · GitHub mperham/lunchy · GitHub mperham/girl_friday · GitHub The Clymb | The Gear You Need. Up To 70% Below […]

Create beautiful JavaScript charts with one line of Ruby using Chartkick #

So many web apps need to visualize data for their users that a high quality charting library is a huge boon for developers. Andrew Kane’s Chartkick might be just the library for Ruby developers.

Chartkick sample

Chartkick works with Rails 3.1+ and makes adding beautiful charts to your web app as easy as a one liner. Create a simple line chart like this:

<%= line_chart User.group_by_day(:created_at).count %>

Or one with multiple series of data like this:

<%= line_chart @goals.map { |goal| 
  {
    :name => goal.name, 
    :data => goal.feats.group_by_week(:created_at).count 
  } 
} %>

A pie chart is as easy as:

<%= pie_chart Goal.group("name").count %>

Chartkick is mostly a JavaScript library with Ruby helpers to generate the required markup that the JavaScript turns into charts. It requires either Google Charts or Highcharts to work, but it doesn’t require Ruby! If you want to use the JavaScript bits from another language, check out Chartkick.js instead.

Chartkick is MIT licensed and hosted on GitHub.

#90: Pair programming and Ruby with Avdi Grimm

Adam Stacoviak, Andrew Thorp and fellow changelogger Steve Klabnik talk about pair programming, distributed teams, workflows, Ruby and more with Avdi Grimm. You can tune-in LIVE on Tuesday’s at 5pm CST. Avdi Grimm (avdi) on Twitter Pair Program With Me Wide Teams | The blog for geographically dispersed organizations Ruby Rogues (podcast) Ruby Tapas | […]